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The Schizoid Disorder of the Self

I threatened in my December post that I would continue my descriptions of character types, so I will delineate one more. That way, for February, I can assign a task for my readers to figure out their type – one that best describes their dominant propensities. You don’t have to exhibit every variable of a specific character, but more than not you exemplify many or most of the traits. This is a fun exercise for couples and educates you on the dynamics at play within the couple as the two types interact, creating their unique family ‘system’.

The Schizoid is most notably an isolated, self-sufficient type. His relationship situation can vary on a spectrum from having relations with family and friends to one that lacks any social contact. The Schizoid is introverted and more comfortable with solitary activities. He spends his mental time with an active fantasy life as a substitute for contact. He appears detached and unemotional about most of his personal issues and can seem cold and disinterested. Beneath this appearance, the Schizoid is sensitive and has deep longing to belong but may not appear that way on the surface. He has suffered pain in his life and therefore is frightened to move too close and get hurt again. So he may appear aloof.

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Reich’s Character Types: Phallic Character Types & the Narcissistic Character

 

Reich divided his types into Categories: Genital, Phallic, Anal, Oral and Ocular Types. These are correlated with developmental phases of growth, affecting the character and their biophysical/energetic progression. If an individual does not sustain the Phallic level, he or she may drop back to a Pregenital level (an earlier level of development) because those fixations or blockages dominate the picture. I will be covering the Pregential characters according to Reich and Object Relations in future posts. For the next few posts, I will be discussing Phallic Character Types, the first one being the Narcissistic Character Type.

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How Does Characteranalysis Differ from Traditional Analysis?

 

A major difference between these two modalities is that Characteranalysis lives and breathes in the here and now and interacts spiritedly with the blatant defensive style and chronic approach of the client.

We learn basic coping strategies early on that are reinforced throughout our lives.
These strategies are carved into our being both mentally and biophysically and create our interface with others. We unconsciously hone patterns of thought, feeling reaction and behavior that keep us afloat, but not as the master of our ship. Sometimes those patterns are hurtful both to our self and others because they are repeatedly destructive.

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